COBRA Refresher: 4 Important Notices That You Need to Know About

COBRAAccording to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget and Reconciliation Act (COBRA), employers who offer a group health plan for more than 20 employees must offer temporary continuous coverage to qualifying beneficiaries after qualifying events.

A qualified beneficiary generally is an individual covered by a group health plan on the day before a qualifying event who is either an employee, the employee’s spouse, or an employee’s dependent child.

A qualifying event is a circumstance that would cause the qualified beneficiary to lose their group plan. The type of event determines the length of coverage offered, but continuous plans range between 18 and 36 months. Here are some examples of qualifying events:

  • The death of a covered employee
  • A covered employee’s termination or reduction of hours
  • The covered employee’s new entitlement to Medicare
  • Divorce or legal separation from a covered employee
  • A dependent child ceasing to be a dependent under the plan’s requirements

Employees must be offered health care, dental, vision, medical spending accounts, hearing, prescription, substance abuse, and mental health plans, but only if you offered those services under your group plan.

Generally, the qualified beneficiary pays the entire cost of the continuous coverage plus two percent to account for your administrative costs. Employees who take COBRA coverage for a disability can be charged 150% of their premiums for coverage after month 18.

Per regulations, employers are required to provide certain COBRA notices with specific information and timeframes, depending on the circumstances.  Failure to comply with these regulations can result in fines of $100 to $400 per day per qualifying beneficiary.

4 Notices Required by COBRA

General Notice

This document describes employees’ COBRA rights and the employer’s responsibilities. It must be given to each covered employee and each employee’s spouse within the first 90 days of coverage. It needs to have the following information:

  • Name of plan and contact information of the plan’s COBRA administrator.
  • A description of the coverage provided by the plan.
  • Instructions for beneficiaries to notify the administrator of qualifying events or disabilities.
  • An explanation of the importance of notifying the administrator about address changes.
  • A statement that the notice does not fully describe COBRA or the plan, and that more information is available through the plan’s administrator.

Click here to see a sample General Notice.

Election Notice

This document explains the employee’s rights to continuation coverage and how to elect it. The administrator must send an election notice to each beneficiary who loses their coverage due to a qualifying event within 14 days.

  • Name of plan and contact information of the plan’s COBRA administrator.
  • Identification of the qualifying event and qualified beneficiaries.
  • An explanation of the beneficiaries’ right to elect continuation coverage.
  • The date coverage will terminate if continuation coverage is not elected.
  • The process to officially elect the coverage.
  • Outcomes if coverage is waived or not elected.
  • How coverage might terminate early.
  • Premium information, including amounts, grace periods, and schedules.
  • The type and scope of coverage available and how it can be extended for disability or other qualifying events.
  • An explanation of the importance of notifying the administrator about address changes.
  • A statement that the notice does not fully describe COBRA or the plan, and that more information is available through the plan’s administrator.

Click here to see a sample Election Notice.

Unavailability of Continuation of Coverage Notice

Should an individual request continuous coverage, but the plan administrator determines that the individual is not entitled to coverage, the administrator must send a notice of unavailability. This simple document must be provided within 14 days of the original request and explain the reason for denial.

Click here to see a sample Unavailability of Continuation of Coverage Notice.

Termination of Coverage Notice

If an individual’s coverage is terminated early, the employer must provide a termination notice. This notice must include the following information:

  • The date coverage will terminate.
  • The reason coverage is being terminated.
  • Any rights the qualified beneficiary has under the plan (or the law) to elect alternative coverage, such as the right to convert the plan to a private policy.

There is no timeframe to provide this notice, but regulations say it should be delivered as soon as the decision to terminate coverage is made.

Click here to see a sample Termination of Coverage Notice.

Providing proper COBRA documentation with the right content is an important part of staying compliant with the legislation, but you also need to document the method, timing, and last address of your deliveries. This is for your protection in case you are required to provide evidence that you upheld your obligations.

For more information about disclosure rules (such as the allowed methods for delivery and specific timing requirements), see CFR 2520.104b-1(B). For a detailed breakdown of your obligations and FAQ’s, visit the Department of Labor’s website.

Navigating the rules and requirements of COBRA can be confusing and overwhelming. If you have questions or concerns, Sinclair Risk is here to help – Give us a call!

Shannon Hudspeth
Human Resource Director
shudspeth@srfm.com

Shannon Hudspeth

8 Steps to Vet Construction Subcontractors

subcontractorAs a general contractor, it’s likely that you’ll use subcontractors at some point. Subcontractors can be an efficient way to outsource work. As specialists, they’ll often do a better job than a generalist and their smaller size means they can work quicker and leaner.

However, the construction job is your responsibility. The performance of the subcontractor will reflect on you. To complete the job properly and satisfy your customer, you need to make sure your subcontractors will produce quality work in a timely manner.

Before you officially hire any subcontractors, protect your business and your customer by taking these steps to vet the subcontractor.

1. Examine their past and current performance

Request information from the potential customer about their licenses, accreditations, history, and references. Look for any public data on lawsuits, disputes, complaints, or bankruptcies. Ask for the contact information of previous contractors they worked for. Then, search for references independently (without the subcontractor’s involvement) to get some unbiased and unfiltered information.

2. Look at their queue of work

It’s smart to make sure potential subcontractors can actually complete the work you need, so you’ll want to examine their log of previous, current, and future work. If the subcontractor seems too busy for their size, your job might overextend them.

3. Ask about their safety practices

Unsafe operations can leave you exposed to liability and force an inspector to close the job site, so make sure any subcontractors have clean or reasonable safety histories. They should also have ample safety protocols in place and a crew who is coached to prioritize safety.

4. Investigate the subcontractor’s employees

Ask the subcontractor about their team. Are they temporary workers, or do they work full time? Have they worked in construction before, or are they new? Does the subcontractor have the proper number of licensed professionals for the site? Do the workers have the right tools and reasonable workloads? Do any have serious felonies or drug problems that might make them unreliable? Answers to these questions will determine whether the subcontractor is right for your job.

5. Validate bonding and insurance

In most states, contractors are required to have bonding. In all states, they must be insured, including worker’s compensation insurance. If the subcontractor doesn’t have these protections in place, you could be held liable if there’s a problem. If the subcontractor doesn’t have these, reject them as candidates.

6. Investigate the subcontractor’s financial health

If your job is large, you’ll want to make sure the subcontractor’s financials are healthy enough to commit. You don’t want their employees to walk off the site one day due to lack of payment, or an inability to purchase materials. Request their annual contractor volume, two years of financial statements, and their total sales and net worth (you might have to sign a confidentiality agreement). Look for signs of poor health, like poor cash flow, a mountain of debt, or declining income.

7. Ask about their quality control process

In order to avoid rework and warranty work, you want your subcontractors to certify the quality of their materials and finished work. Every professional business should have a procedure in place to guarantee quality assurance. This procedure is rarely complex, but a successful business will have an answer to your questions.

8. Demand a written contract

It is shocking how many people work without a written agreement. As a contractor who is purchasing labor, you need to protect your investment. Every deal should be bound by a contract that clearly describes your expectations, including the scope of work, timeframe, and payment arrangements. Describe what you will provide and what the subcontractor will provide in terms of materials, warranties, and cleanup.

Hiring a subcontractor is like hiring an employee: You want someone who will represent your business well without adding drama, stress, or financial burden. If you follow the steps listed above, you’ll find the right candidate and build a lasting relationship.

Jonathan Belek
Risk Management Consultant
jbelek@srfm.com

Jon Belek

Is Your Healthcare Plan Covering People It Shouldn’t?

healthcare eligibilityIf you provide an employer healthcare plan, it’s vital to ensure only the correct people are covered. Comprehensive healthcare insurance is one of the most important benefits you provide to employees, so keeping premiums down matters to everyone.

One of the main causes of rising premiums and healthcare costs is when ineligible people continue to be covered on a healthcare plan. For employer-provided health insurance, ineligible people are typically:

  • Former employees who have now left your business.
  • Employees whose status has changed, meaning they are no longer eligible under the plan, or should be on a different plan.
  • Dependents of an employee, where the status of the dependent has changed.

Examples of ineligible people for a healthcare plan

The following situations could all cause people to become ineligible.

  • A dependent child who ages beyond the dependent eligibility requirements in the plan.
  • A former spouse who separated from your employee.
  • An employee who leaves your business.
  • An employee whose status has changed, for example through changing the number of hours worked or moving to a different position, and whose new status requires a different healthcare plan.

Creating a healthcare eligibility audit

You need a process to understand and remove people from your employer-provided healthcare plan. Here’s how to put an “Employee and dependent healthcare eligibility audit” together.

Understand the eligibility requirements of your current employer-provided healthcare plans

Go through any existing employer-provided plans and note down:

  • All employees currently covered by the plan.
  • All dependents currently covered by the plan.
  • Eligibility requirements for employees.
  • Eligibility requirements for employee dependents.
  • Benefits and coverage provided.

You may hold this information internally, or you can get the data from your broker or healthcare insurance provider.

Analyze your existing employee data

Match your existing employee data against the healthcare plan eligibility requirements. Check:

  • Any employee listed as being on the plan is still employed by you.
  • Any dependent listed on the plan is still a dependent on the employee.
  • The type of healthcare plan is appropriate for the status of the employee.
  • All eligibility requirements are being met by any active plan participants.

Find gaps in the data

It’s likely that you will find gaps in the information. You may not have the latest details of dependents or employees. Complete a gap analysis to understand the data you need to ensure only appropriate people are covered by the plan.

Carry out a healthcare eligibility audit to close any gaps

Once you know what data you need, you will need to audit the information with your employees. Approach each employee with the details of their health insurance for them and their dependents and ask if all the information is factual and correct. If it is, get them to sign off on the information.

If the data is incorrect, get it updated and see how it affects healthcare eligibility. Communicate this back to the employee.

Careful communication is key

You will need to communicate carefully throughout this process. Employees may see the eligibility audit as a tool for taking away healthcare coverage. It’s important to manage the message carefully — The audit ensures only appropriate, eligible people are covered. That means less cost-leakage and medical expenses on plans, which keeps premiums down and ensures the right people have the right coverage.

You may want to complete the healthcare eligibility audit every year. This will ensure your records are up to date and reduce the premiums you and your employees need to spend.

Jill Goulet
Risk Management Consultant
jgoulet@srfm.com

healthcare eligibility

Trucking P&C Pro-File Newsletter – February 2017

New Study Links Multiple Health Conditions to Preventable Crashes

It can be extremely difficult for commercial truck drivers to stay healthy on the job. Drivers often work long hours without rest, stay seated all day and don’t have access to exercise or nutritious meals. However, a new study conducted by the University of Utah School of Medicine found that drivers with three or more health conditions are much more likely to get into preventable crashes.

The study, which examined the medical records of nearly 50,000 commercial drivers, tracked a number of medical conditions that could have a negative impact on a driver’s performance—such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and anxiety.

Although the study found that drivers who have only one of the conditions

could often control it while on the road, the number of crashes increased significantly when drivers had three or more conditions. The average rate for crashes that result in an injury for all truck drivers is approximately 29 for every 100 million miles traveled, but the rate is 93 for every 100 million miles traveled for drivers who have at least three of the flagged conditions.

Transportation Industry Seeks to Limit New Rule-making

Representatives from the transportation industry have petitioned the Trump administration to slow the rule-making procedures of various federal agencies by adding more steps to the process and including business representatives in future rule-making discussions.

Although agencies such as the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) currently go through public steps in their rule-making processes, some business owners believe that the Obama administration bypassed these processes through executive orders and safety advisories. They say this could force businesses to adopt costly new procedures with little evidence of their effectiveness.

New Interstate Passenger Resource

The FMCSA recently released an online

resource to help businesses that transport passengers across state lines. The resource includes a list of requirements that have changed over the years as a result of litigation, legislation, and rule-making. Additionally, passenger carriers can determine their registration requirements, minimum levels of financial responsibility and any applicable safety and commercial regulations.

For more information on keeping your business compliant with FMCSA regulations, contact us at 203-265-0996 today.

Jonathan Belek
Risk Management Consultant
jbelek@srfm.com

Jon Belek

High blood pressure — A hidden danger for your truck drivers

Doctor with patientIf you’re running a logistics business or division, you know how important it is to have reliable and healthy truck drivers. Although most health conditions are easy to diagnose and treat, there’s one in particular that’s tricky to spot — High blood pressure. That’s because high blood pressure (also known as hypertension) often doesn’t show any symptoms, and that’s a real problem.

Left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to significant problems for your truck drivers including:

  • An enlarged heart, a big risk for heart failure.
  • Aneurysms in blood vessels, which can be fatal.
  • Kidney failure.
  • Vision problems and blindness.

It’s estimated that over 65 million Americans (around a third of the adult population) have high blood pressure, and one in three of those people aren’t aware they’re affected.

Why high blood pressure is a real issue for truck drivers
Truck drivers have a greater risk of high blood pressure than others, mainly due to the nature of their work. Some of the causes of high blood pressure include:

  • A poor diet with too much salt — Eating healthily on the road is a real challenge, and many truck drivers will opt for fast food. Unfortunately, the high proportion of salt and lack of other nutrients is a risk factor.
  • Too much alcohol – We hope you already have drug and alcohol testing policy and procedures in place to ensure no drinking on the job, but you can’t control what happens after hours.
  • Lack of exercise — Spending almost all of their working life behind the wheel of a truck leaves little time for exercise. Being overweight or obese significantly increases the chances of high blood pressure.
  • Stress and anxiety — Dealing with other road users can create significant stress for long-haul truck drivers.

Dealing with high blood pressure issues for your drivers
As with most health issues, prevention is much better than cure. That’s why taking a few simple steps could reduce the risk of high blood pressure in your drivers, help them stay healthy, and reduce downtime due to sickness. Some of the steps you can take include:

  • Education and training — Let your truck drivers know about the risks of high blood pressure including why and how they could be impacted. Encourage them to get tested and provide clear, simple ways for them to get training on how to avoid the issue.
  • Policy changes — Introduce policies that encourage healthier behavior. Give truck drivers a 30 or 45 minute break each day that they can use to exercise. Incentivize them to eat more healthily by providing discounts for particular types of restaurants or meals.
  • Support and resources — Get some help in place. Arrange for a nurse to come on site to provide blood pressure testing and personalized advice on what your truck drivers can do. Provide maps of where to find restaurants with healthy eating options on the popular trucking routes. Introduce a formal wellness program into your workplace.
  • Health insurance and medication — Even with all these preventative measures, you will still have some drivers who develop high blood pressure problems. In those cases, you’ll want to ensure they have the right health insurance and get access to the doctors and medications they need to control their medical conditions.

If you want to keep your truck drivers healthy and happy, you can start right now. Just using one or two of these suggestions could significantly reduce the frequency and impact of high blood pressure problems. That means healthier employees, less time off sick, and a more efficient trucking operation.

Jonathan Belek
Risk Management Consultant
jbelek@srfm.com

blood pressure trucking

Your Business Resolution — Time For a Fresh Approach

business resolutionsFor many, January is the perfect time for a new start. Resolutions to go on a diet, exercise more, pay off debt, get a new job, and otherwise improve our lifestyles are as popular as ever. But, there’s another area where a fresh start can make a big difference — Your business.

The fact is, you’re probably so involved in the day-to-day running of your organization that you don’t take a step back and get a better perspective. When you’re able to step away for just a little while and look at things objectively, the chances are you can find some good stuff to improve in your business. Here’s how to go about it.

Step 1 — Set aside the time

Get some time in the diary in early January to remove yourself from everyday operations and allow yourself to review how you could improve how your business functions, policies, and procedures. Encourage your leadership team, key managers, and a selection of employees to be involved.  Not only is their input critical, it will also remove some of the burden off your shoulders.

Step 2 — Get out of the workplace

You can’t do this with distractions. Go offsite and have an away day where you can minimize the chance of interruptions and actually get some initiatives in place, bring key members of your team along with you.  Make it engaging, fun and ensure you have white boards to capture your ideas.  Take pictures so you can save the details of your discussion.

Step 3 — Identify the main areas you want to improve

Have an honest and open discussion with your team. Let everyone bring up the main pain points in the business. What’s unnecessarily complicated or difficult to do? What policies, procedures, or functions could be improved? You’ll want to keep the discussion constructive, but don’t leave anything off the table.

Step 4 — Categorize the problems

You’ll want to split the various issues into categories, for example:

  • People related — More training needed, new team setup, staff handbook updates etc.
  • Policy related — New and amended policies to make your workplace easier to do business in.
  • Procedure related — Changes to business processes, ways of doing things, and functionality.
  • Technology related — Issues with technology, hardware, software, etc.
  • Other — Any other issues that don’t fit neatly into the previous categories.

Step 5 — Brainstorm fixes

Once you’ve got your categories, see if any of the problems are related. After you’ve done that, go through and generate ideas on how to fix the various issues, especially your policies and procedures. Don’t consider any idea to be too outlandish.

Step 6 — Prioritize

Once you’ve got your ideas, prioritize the fixes. Deliver on ideas that are easy to implement and will have a good impact. Follow that up with the harder implementations that will still make a big difference. After that, carry out the changes that will still have an impact, even if it’s minor.

Step 7 — Give people accountability

Once you have a list of ideas, get people in your business to take ownership of them. Get project management in place to deliver on the ideas and fix the broken parts of your business. Then, get regular updates throughout the year on how things are going. Give your project managers the resources and people they need to make a positive change.

This can be a great way to incentivize and fire up your people to change their working environment. Whether it’s removing bottlenecks in a process, rewriting a policy, enhancing training for team members, improving hiring methods, or replacing old technology, small changes can have a big impact.

Carry this out every January, deliver on your changes, and you’ll have a beautifully functioning, sleek, and efficient operation in less time than you think.

Matt Bauer
President
mbauer@srfm.com

Business Resolution

Are you ready to comply with the new DOL Overtime Payment Rules?

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a final rule regarding overtime wage payment qualifications for the “white collar exemptions” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

How does this rule affect your business? The final rule increases the salary an employee must be paid in order to qualify for a white collar exemption. The required salary level is increased to $47,476 per year and will be automatically updated every three years. The final rule does not modify the duties test employees must meet to qualify for a white collar exemption.

Employers will need to comply with this rule by Dec. 1, 2016.

Overtime Rule Change

How can you prepare yourself to comply with the new rule? Follow these steps:

  • Become familiar with the new rule and identify which employees will be affected. Employers should reclassify employees as exempt or non-exempt, as necessary, by Dec. 1, 2016.
  • Consider communicating any work schedule changes to affected employees before the date mentioned above.
  • Evaluate whether implementing new timekeeping practices and training for managers and supervisors on the new requirements is necessary.

The White Collar Exemption

The white collar exemptions are minimum wage and overtime pay exemptions available to certain administrative, professional, outside sales, computer and highly compensated employees.

To qualify for the white collar exemption, an employee must meet a salary basis test, a salary level test and a duties test – the employee must meet all three tests in order to be exempt from FLSA minimum wage or overtime pay requirements.

The three tests are outlined below:

  • The salary basis test is used to make sure the employee is paid a predetermined and fixed salary that is not subject to reduction due to variations in the quality or quantity of work.
  • The salary level test is used to ensure that the employee meets a minimum specified amount to qualify for the exemption. This salary threshold provides employers with an objective and efficient way to determine whether an employee qualifies for a white collar exemption.
  • The duties test requires that the employee’s job duties conform to executive, administrative or professional duties, as defined by law. This analysis requires a more thorough evaluation of whether an employee can be classified in one of these categories: administrative, professional, outside sales, computer and highly compensated employee.

Higher Salary Threshold Requirement

The final rule increases the minimum salary level of $455 per week ($23,660 per year) to $913 per week or $47,476 per year. The new salary level represents the 40th percentile of wages earned by workers in the lowest-wage census region in the United States (currently the South) for a full-year worker.

The final rule also increases the $100,000 salary level for highly compensated individuals to $134,004 per year—the 90th percentile of wages earned by full-time workers across the entire United States.

These higher salary levels will be updated every three years to maintain the salary level at their corresponding 40th or 90th percentiles. The first automatic rate update is expected by Jan. 1, 2020. The DOL will publish updated rates in the Federal Register and on the Wage and Hour Division’s website at least 150 days before their effective date.

Calculating Employee Wages

Administrative, Executive and Professional Employees

The final rule will allow, for the first time, non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions) to be used to satisfy up to 10 percent of an employee’s standard salary level. This may include the payment of non-discretionary incentive bonuses tied to productivity and profitability. Non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments may be used if they are paid on a quarterly basis, but more frequent payments are acceptable. However, the DOL will allow employers to make some “catch-up payments.”

The DOL will also allow employers to use significantly large bonuses toward 10 percent of the required salary amount.

Highly Compensated Employees

Under the final rule, highly compensated employees qualify for an overtime exception if they meet the new salary level of $134,004 per year. However these individuals must receive at least the full standard salary amount each pay period (i.e., $913 per week, $1,826 bi-weekly or $3,956.33 per month) on a salary or fee basis (not counting non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments).

The remainder of a highly compensated employee’s wages may be calculated by including the full amount of non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions).

Impact on Employers

Given the significant increase in the salary level requirement, employers will need to increase employee salaries, or re-classify certain employees as either exempt or non-exempt, solely based on their salary level. The DOL estimates that this final rule extends overtime protections to approximately 4.2 million workers who are currently exempt under the white collar rules and clarifies overtime compensation eligibility for another 5.7 million white collar workers and 3.2 million salaried blue collar workers whose entitlement to overtime pay will no longer rely on the application of the duties test.

In addition, because of the short implementation deadline, employers should not delay becoming familiar with the new requirements and implementing any necessary changes into their timekeeping and payroll systems. Employers should also determine whether additional training on modifications is necessary for their managers and supervisors.

Finally, employers should also consider communicating with employees to inform them of how their wages, hours of work and timekeeping practices will be affected.

Enforcement and Compliance

Employers that fail to comply with the final rule may be subject to a variety of overtime wage payment enforcement mechanisms, including the ones listed below.

  • Private employee lawsuits: These lawsuits can be initiated by employees either individually or through collective action to recover back pay, interest, attorneys’ fees and court costs.
  • Administrative injunctions: These injunctions may include a prohibition on the shipment of goods in interstate commerce if the goods were produced in violation of the FLSA (including overtime wage payment provisions).
  • Civil fines for willful and repeated violations (up to $1,100 per violation).
  • Criminal charges for willful violations (up to $10,000 in fines, imprisonment for up to six months or both).

These laws can seem confusing and complex. If you have questions or need more information, please contact Sinclair Risk & Financial Management – we’re here to help!

Shannon Hudspeth
Human Resource Director
Overtime Rule Changes

Protect Your Healthcare Organization with a Strong Pre-Screening Process

Protect Your Healthcare Organization with a Strong Pre-Screening Process

Hiring is a complicated component of business that always opens a company to liability. Hiring an ineligible candidate doesn’t just risk fines and litigation,  it can also affect the organization’s brand, which can cause long-lasting financial damage.

In the HireRight 2013 Spotlight, 56% of healthcare organizations said background screening improves the hiring process and protects the company from liability. Not only does a qualified, eligible hire deliver good service, they also represent the brand positively. 40% of healthcare organizations believe background checking improves safety. 44% believe background checking improves regulatory compliance.

It’s the job of good managers to ensure that new hires are eligible to provide healthcare to patients. No matter how experienced a hiring manager may be, a “good feeling” is not an indication of anything. You have to do your homework, which means building and enacting a screening process.

When you consider an applicant, the first place you should look is the Office of Inspector General’s List of Excluded Individuals/Entities, which lists people and organizations that are excluded from federally funded healthcare programs.

Entities are excluded because of past Medicare fraud, patient neglect or abuse, or felony or misdemeanor convictions of healthcare-related fraud, theft, or misconduct of any kind. Any healthcare organization who hires an excluded entity won’t be reimbursed for costs and may end up paying significant monetary penalties (up to $500,000 per ineligible employee).

Next, check state and federal data sources to ensure your applicants are properly licensed and aren’t carrying medical sanctions. Unfortunately, there’s no comprehensive source for sanction data in the United States. Hiring managers would be smart to check multiple sources to reduce their risk, such as the National Practitioner Databank and the Connecticut Department of Public Health.

Third, test candidates and new hires for drugs and alcohol use. This isn’t required by law, but the risk of exposure to lawsuits if a patient is injured by an impaired worker is significant. Continue testing employees routinely and randomly to deter unsafe behavior.

Finally, review your screening process at least once a year. As laws and regulations change, you’ll want to ensure your screening program adapts accordingly to identify gaps. Ensuring you have an effective process will improve the reliability of your overall hiring.

The National Business Research Institute says the number one reason organizations cut corners on pre-screening is because they’re desperate to fill positions. Slow down and investigate carefully. Have you considered potential aliases? Have you verified the applicant’s credentials, licenses and education?

Rushing the screening (and the interview process as a whole) is a terrible mistake that can leave your company open to massive liability. Always make the time to thoroughly complete your screening process (or use an agency specifically for this purpose) and check future applicants’ personal and professional references.

Heather Sinclair
Risk Management Consultant
hsinclair@srfm.com

Protect Your Healthcare Organization with a Strong Pre-Screening Process

Why Your Healthcare Organization Needs a Hospice Division

Home healthcare nurse helps senior woman use walker.When the end comes, most of us agree that it’s best to go pain-free at home with our families, rather than surrounded by a sterile medical environment and strangers.

The hospice movement began in London, 1967, when physician Dame Cicely Saunders founded St. Christopher’s Hospice. The movement eventually came to the States by way of the Yale School of Nursing, where nurses combined medical, psychological, and spiritual treatments to comfort dying patients. They offered a dignified, painless way for patients to die.

Originally a social movement, hospice has now become a massive, multimillion dollar industry served by nonprofit and for-profit institutions alike. 52% are for-profit, 35% are nonprofit, and 13% are operated by the government.

Hospitals and healthcare organizations are increasingly adding palliative care options like hospice programs to their business models, and yours should too.

1. Since 1982, Medicare has provided hospice benefits to patients who have no more than six months left to live (as certified by two doctors). This reimbursement essentially makes hospice available to everyone. Congress seems content funding this endeavor indefinitely.

2. Hospice programs are especially profitable. These programs lend themselves well to careful business decisions in regards to staffing and the recruitment of patients. A 2005 study in the Journal of Palliative Medicine found hospice programs owned by large for-profit companies generate margins nine times higher than nonprofit hospice programs. Hospice programs are paid by Medicare and insurance providers by day, not per treatment (like most other forms of healthcare).

3. Hospice programs benefit greatly from doctor referrals. Patients and their families rarely shop for a hospice program as they would a primary care physician or specialist. They are overwhelmed and unwilling to make complicated decisions during this time. When a doctor, hospital or nursing home recommends a program, the patients and families usually accept this option immediately, without evaluating the program’s merits. Hospice programs that work closely with doctors in the same healthcare organization can collaborate on the best care practices that suit the patient and the business.

4. Volunteerism is popular in the hospice industry. At any given time, there are more than 400,000 volunteers providing certain levels of care, spending time with patients, and other duties. This is an extremely effective way of trimming costs while providing valuable, rewarding volunteer experiences to the community and bolstering the spirits of ailing patients.

5. This specialized niche of the healthcare industry is growing rapidly. Soon, the aging baby boomer population will be seeking hospice care from their healthcare providers in tremendous numbers. 

Your hospice program doesn’t have to be heartless. Many programs allow patients to continue to receive treatment during hospice care. There have been many instances where hospice care has ceased because a patient has recovered significantly or resolved to continue treatment.

Without a doubt, developing a hospice program for your healthcare organization is a smart and effective way to meet the needs of your patients and achieve your business goals.

Heather Sinclair
Risk Management Consultant
hsinclair@srfm.com

Why Your Healthcare Organization Needs a Hospice Division

Can Manufacturing Overcome the Widening Skills Gap?

Can Manufacturing Overcome the Widening Skills Gap?Manufacturing has always correlated with rapid economic growth. Time and time again we’ve seen manufacturing businesses create jobs and elevate a community’s standard of living. The development of a factory is the saving grace of poor communities all over the world.

The International Monetary Fund and U.S. government projections expect our manufacturing sector to grow by 3 or 4 percent over the next two years. It’s good business for investors, too: we add $1.37 to our national economy for every dollar invested in manufacturing. Despite this optimistic future, the industry is poised to face some familiar challenges.

Like other wealthy nations, the general population of the United States is aging. By 2025, nearly 25% of all persons will be older than 60.

The manufacturing sector is experiencing this trend the hardest. In 2000, the median age of the manufacturing workforce was 40.5 years old. In 2012, the median age climbed to 44.7 years, significantly higher than other sectors.

This aging of the industry has created a skills gap that is getting wider every year. Over the next decade, two million of the available 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will go unfulfilled. Employers won’t be able to find skilled workers.

Experts believe the talent gap is caused by a number of reasons:

  1. Baby boomers are beginning to retire in tremendous numbers, leaving more positions vacant than the up-and-coming workforce can fill.
  2. Trending economic expansion continues to create more jobs (about 700,000 over the next decade) that can’t be filled.
  3. There is a negative image of the manufacturing industry among younger generations. Even though executives are willing to pay higher than market rate, positions remain unfilled.
  4. There has been a slow decline of technical education in public schools, leading to fewer graduates pursuing science, technology, engineering, and math degrees.

The Manufacturing Institute found that a majority of manufacturing executives consider talent loss their toughest struggle. They fear the skills gap will cause an inability to create and implement new technologies to meet customer demand and increase productivity. Naturally, these challenges will deter profitability and growth.

The industry has come become quite diverse. Automation, data, robotics and engineering play a big role in nearly every manufacturing facility in the United States. Manufacturing is expected to continue changing, which means the industry desperately needs tech-savvy young people who can adapt to new processes and technologies.e a long way. Instead of easy-to-replace repetitive jobs, industrial operations hav

Admittedly, attracting a new workforce is challenging. In order to maintain some manufacturing status in the global economy, we have to infuse the industry with younger talent. Companies need to feed young people’s interest and show that manufacturing can be a rewarding career.

This can be best achieved by creating partnerships with schools (at the secondary and collegiate levels) to invest in technical education and offering extra-curricular programs that inspire manufacturing-related skills.

To combat the skills gap, employers need to view training and workforce development as an investment in their company, not an inconvenient expense. They must build never-ending learning into their employees’ roles so skills can stay sharp and agile. Furthermore, they need to find effective ways to transfer the knowledge of their aging population to the young recruits or risk losing competitive advantages.

Jonathan Belek
Risk Management Consultant
jbelek@srfm.com
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